The Importance of The Morning Greeting

My favorite podcast, Manger Tools, recently released an episode titled The Morning Greeting. I liked the episode because it speaks to an important activity I learned many years ago working as a store manager for the Bon Marche (now Macys).

Basically, it is simply the act of saying good morning to each of your direct reports every day and the positive impact it generates.

Mike and Mark go into quite a bit of detail on the mechanics of how to greet direct reports which I found humorous.  I know there are many managers who find it difficult to circulate and greet their employees so I understand their need to go into detail.  It came naturally to me early in my career as I observed  effective managers I worked with and as I developed my own style.

When I was in retail, I would make the point of circulating through my store every morning and greet each of my employees (direct reports, sales and sales support associates) by name.  Sometimes I would cruise by their department, wave and say “Good morning, Joan!” and sometimes I would  stop and chat a bit – either about business or personal stuff or both, depending on what was going on in the store or in their lives.

I would also make a point of circulating through the store as I left for the day, catching the late shift,  and say “Goodnight!” to each employee by name.

Each time I started in a new store, I would immediately begin my greeting activity and quickly learn every employee’s name along the way.  I was told I was the first store manager who did this and/or even knew their names.

I often startled new employees when I would approach and greet them but they quickly learned I was OK and approachable.  While I did much more than just “the daily greet” to my employees, this simple activity was a significant factor in creating a tremendous amount of trust and loyalty among my teams.

In my current job as an HR leader, I have five direct reports but  still make a point of greeting all 16 employees, by name, in my office every morning.  I also do the same when I visit the mine or the Wyoming office.  Similar to when I was a store manager, sometimes its just a quick greeting with a wave or a chat for a few minutes.

As a result, I am on friendly terms with everybody in the office and know and understand a lot of what is going on at many different levels.  This allows me to do my job, as the HR leader in my company, more effectively and provide greater value to my company.  More importantly, knowing my co-coworkers as I do helps me enjoy my job more.

I would challenge all HR leaders and managers, even Mike and Mark who said it isn’t realistic or practical to greet 30 people every morning, to take the time to greet all their direct reports and steps even if there are 30+ of them.  I did it in a 60,000 square foot store with nearly 30+ people working during any given shift.  The time you take to do this is nothing compared to the value you derive.

It is a simple and powerful management activity.

A Manager’s Most Important Responsibility

What is a manager’s most important responsibility?  It’s quite simple, actually.

The most important responsibility of any manager is to hire the best people they can.

Think about it.

What happens to everybody’s workload when a manager makes a good hire?  We love it!!

A good hire makes everybody more productive by allowing them to continue their work while being competent enough to do their own. A good hire is somebody who others enjoy working with creating a positive work environment which increases morale and production. It’s motivating when the new hire fits in well  and effectively contributes.

What happens to everybody’s workload when a manager makes a bad hire?  We hate it!!

A bad hire creates more work for everybody as they compensate for the poor performer.  A bad hire can also create a poisoned work environment leading to poor morale and reducing overall production.   A bad hire can make good employees flee the organization if nothing appropriate is done to remedy the situation.  We’ve all made bad, if not horrible, hiring decisions in our career.  I certainly have and have paid the price.

As an HR leader, it’s vital that we train and coach managers on how to effectively recruit, interview, hire, develop, and retain great employees.

So many managers “shoot from the hip” when it comes to these critical steps.  Sure they get it right sometimes and justify their methods by focusing on when they did well.  If they were honest with themselves, however, they would say they got it wrong more than they got it right.

With the huge impact a good or bad hire can have on an organization a manager’s most important responsibility is to hire the best people they can.

The Fight to Survive – Competition is Good in the HR Certification Space

It seems that almost every certified HR leader has an opinion about SHRM’s abandoning their support of HRCI’s certifications and rolling out their own.  The vast majority of what I’ve read or heard is critical of SHRM and supportive of HRCI.

Frankly, I think SHRM’s entry into the space is a good thing.  A very good thing.  I am a believer in free market competition and I think having two HR certification competitors battle it out will only make it better for the profession in the end.

Case in point, HRCI has already responded by increasing their marketing.  I see them advertising everywhere in all the prominent HR magazines and websites.  Maybe they advertised this heavily before, but I doubt it.  Monopolies don’t need to advertise and market.

I received a letter from HRCI on August 1 reminding me of the value of their certificates and promised that I will be hearing back from them soon about how they are “shaping the future of HR certification and providing me with new opportunities to connect with other HR professionals within our community.”  I was impressed.  The letter sends the signal that they are clearly working hard to maintain their status as the Certificate of Choice!

I even received a tweet from Rebecca Hastings, the HRCI HR Content Manager, asking me if I had read this article at the HRCI website.  She was responding to my post here where I said I was OK with two certifications.

This is all very good.  They are being very smart by getting out there when they are still the only game in town to aggressively promote and market their products.

Let’s be honest about the value of our certification.  Its really only important to those of us in HR.   The executives in our companies don’t really know anything about HRCI and their certifications.  For example, my boss was very supportive when I told him I earned my SPHR but he didn’t really know or understand what it meant.  I had to give him a print out from their website describing the SPHR certification to help explain it to him and “prove” that it was a significant accomplishment.

The other executives in my organization also don’t really know and understand what it is.  In fact, I get the impression they think it’s “cute” that HR has a certification.  But, in their minds, it doesn’t rise to the level of a CPA (Certified Public Accountant), PE (Professional Engineer), or a PG (Professional Geologist).

With the two organizations fighting for prominence, I’m hoping there is a lot of press outside of the HR media platforms.  If so, our company executives will see this and take notice and realize that there are important professional certifications in the HR profession.  Rather than think the competition is hurting our profession, I think most of our executives will understand and appreciate it.

Here are the four reasons I think it’s a good thing to have competing certifications.

  1. Improved quality.  As the two are competing for prominence, the quality of their products – the certificates – will improve out of necessity.  Maybe HRCI will finally provide a decent website!
  2. Greater visibility.  Both organizations will aggressively advertise and promote their products.  A lot more will be written about both.  This will hopefully leak out into the main stream media and be noticed by the non HR executives in our organizations.
  3. Increased transparency.  Both organizations will need to build or retain the confidence of their stakeholders.  In order to emerge as the prominent certificate provider, both organizations will need to become more transparent in how they conduct their activities to build and retain their brand presence.  SHRM will need to make an extra effort with their transparency in light of how they rolled out their announcement.
  4. Improved credibility.  When this all shakes out in the next several years, one certification will emerge as the winner.  It will have fought the battle, taken on the criticisms, and made the changes and adjustments needed to win.  It will have advanced the certification and profession along far more than it would have had their not been the battle.

I’m going to watch this all with a great deal of interest.  I am not taking sides.  I love my SPHR.  I worked hard for it and am proud to sport those letters whenever I can.  On the other hand, I also love the fact that SHRM is going to shake things up and challenge the status quo.

I will maintain my SPHR and I will go through the process of earning my SHRM–SCP early in 2015.  I will also proudly sport both sets of initials after my name.  I will fully support both because I think both are important and that the upcoming battle between the two organizations will ultimately benefit the HR profession.

Another Bad Leadership Decision by the Miami Dolphins

pounceyAs you may or may not know, I am a long suffering Miami Dolphins fan.  I became a Dolphin fan as a youngster in the early 1970s when the team dominated the NFL and have been loyal to them ever since. 

Last year, the Dolphins suffered through a well publicized harassment scandal involving offensive linemen Richie Incognito, Mike Pouncey, John Jerry, and Jonathan Martin.  I wrote about the scandal in several posts here at HHHR because it was a serious HR topic and it involved my favorite professional sports team – two of my worlds colliding! 

I was hoping that this year I wouldn’t need to write about the Dolphins or their harassment issues.

Unfortunately, I was wrong and here I am again. 

Coach Philbin prefers a “Leadership Council” instead of captains for his team.  Last year the team voted on who they wanted on the Leadership Council.  Turned out that two of the five members of the Council were prominently involved in  last year’s harassment scandal – Richie Incognito and Mike Pouncey.  Obviously, a huge mistake that had significant implications for the 2013 Dolphins organization. 

This year, coach Philbin continued the Leadership Council but had coaches select the members instead.  The Council now consists of one or two of the most senior members of each position group and numbers 15 players. 

Believe it or not, the coaches selected Mike Pouncey. 

When I heard this, I was floored.  What were they thinking?

Sure, I get that he is the most senior member of the OL and that he is one of the best centers in the NFL but his actions and his behavior last year (and this year) are toxic to the team.  He does not deserve to be on the Leadership Council.

Let’s review his actions and behavior from the past twelve months:

  • Prominently cited in the Ted Well’s Dolphins harassment report as an instigator in the harassment. 
  • Subpoenaed to testify in the former Patriot Aaron Hernandez murder trial (Hernandez and Pouncey are friends and former college teammates).
  • Was photographed publically wearing a “Free Hernandez” hat in support of his “friend” and refused to apologize for it.
  • Is currently being sued for his alleged involvement in a nightclub fight a couple months ago.

The guy can’t seem to stay out of trouble and has a recent history of making very poor choices. 

I don’t understand the thinking process that went into the decision to reward him with a spot on the Leadership Council.  The message it sends to the rest of the team is not a good one.  The message it sends to Pouncey is that he is actually being rewarded for his previous bad behavior. 

I believe that he will continue his bad behavior and will continue to get himself into trouble, causing problems for the team.  In fact, he will be empowered to continue.  He has never really had to face any real consequences for his behavior. 

I assume the thinking is that he will learn from the other 14 members of the Council and that there will be more voices where one will not have the opportunity influence and overshadow the others, like last year. 

Based on what happened last year and the trouble that Pouncy continues to get himself into, he does not deserve to be rewarded with a spot on the council.  If the Dolphins are trying to clean up their image – an image that was seriously damaged by the scandal last year – they should not have even considered putting him on the Council. 

I’ve seen it happen many times.  The highly talented and skilled troublemaking employee is shielded from discipline and often even rewarded because they are “too valuable” to the organization.  Never once have I seen this situation end up a positive one. 

I don’t think this end well for the Dolphins.

I hope I’m wrong.  Sadly, I’m pretty sure I’m right. 

Respect for HR

I came across this blog post – Why Do We Seem to Hate All the Things that Make HR Great – on TLNT over the weekend.

I can tell you I don’t hate the things that make HR great.

Having been a General Manager for Macys for approximately 15 years, I found the soft skills and people smarts are what made me and my management style effective and productive.  A critical part of being a “business person” is to have the soft skills.

Peter Drucker has been writing about these skills since the 1930s and those who read and practice his recommendations are usually very successful.  I understand that there are many in management who don’t consider the soft skills important but that is to their determent.

HR needs to embrace these soft skills and have the courage practice and promote them every chance we get with those in the the other parts of the business.  We should never apologize for being HR and should take our roles as strategic contributors seriously.  We need to speak up when we see something that needs to be addressed from an HR standpoint.  We need to be just as assertive and confident as those in Accounting, Finance, IT, and Management.

We need to act like we belong because we do.

Maintain an Updated and Current Résumé

Keeping an updated résumé for yourself is an important part of being a professional HR leader.  As HR leaders, we often neglect our responsibility to our own career.

You never want to be caught without a current and updated résumé because you never know when you may suddenly be out of a job or have an opportunity of a lifetime come your way.

Having a current and updated résumé will significantly speed up the process of starting the new job search.  It’s also very impressive to immediately provide your résumé to that potential new employer or recruiter of a new opportunity.  Sends the message that you are organized and prepared.

So, I recommend that you schedule an half hour to an hour each quarter to review your résumé and update your accomplishments from the past three months.  Schedule this task in your calendar to repeat every three months so you won’t forget.  It’s so much easier to do this on a regular schedule than trying to go back and remember all your accomplishments several years back.

Build a “Master Résumé” that contains all of your accomplishments from all of your jobs.  This document will probably end up being several pages long.  From your Master Résumé, you can edit it down to one page using only the relevant accomplishments for the job you are applying for.

Most people probably haven’t updated their résumé’s since they started their current job.  Dig out your résumé now and start adding all the accomplishments you can think of since you started.  Once you get going and are in the mode of adding those accomplishments, you will be surprised at how many more will surface in your memory.

Once you build your Master Resume and schedule an update reminder every three months, you will feel much more confident and secure should you need to start a job hunt or quickly provide it to a recruiter for an exciting new opportunity.

Introducing the First Tool in the Hard Hat HR Tool Belt

Today, I am very excited to introduce the very first tool for the Hard Hat HR Tool Belt – 8 Tactical Actions to Help Build Your Online Presence.

In today’s highly competitive and connected world, it is critical for HR leaders to have excellent online visibility. The best way to gain this visibility is to build a strong and cohesive Online Brand Presence by carefully following the 8 tactical actions detailed in this guide.

Once established, your online presence will gain you a great deal of credibility. You will be seen as an HR expert and thought leader by your current employer as well as any potential future employers. This can lead to possible career advancement and financial rewards!

You can get the download here.  The tool is completely free and all I ask, in exchange, is for your email address so I can stay in touch with you with the HHHR Update and you can be first in line for future tools.